General Data Protection Regulation: Keeping Your Company Safe

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If you’re in the business of storing, managing, or holding personal data on behalf of hundreds or thousands of people, then it’s time to take your data protection seriously. This is especially true if you work for an international company.

That’s because on May 25th 2018 the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into effect. If you don’t know what this is about so far, read on the details compiled by https://fomoconews.com/ .

Every year, companies all over the world receive thousands of requests from people who want to see their personal information that has been stored with these organizations. With this new law, this has become even more frequent. According to the UK-based think tank Open Banking Forum, over 34% of UK banking consumers are currently dealing with data access requests.

But the GDPR is not only aimed at national companies. It extends to any organization that holds or processes personal information on individuals or other people in the EU member states. The regulation therefore applies to companies that store or process data of other organizations.

The possibility for everyone to hold their own company’s board accountable under this new legislation is clearly an issue that affects both multinational and local organizations.

Matrix, Binary, Security, Code

So, you think your company is GDPR-compliant? 

Think again…

Because of this law, which comes into effect in only a few months, all companies (regardless of their size or location) need to be GDPR-compliant.

The GDPR guideline is divided into 99 articles with a total of 282 paragraphs. This basically means that implementing the new legislation can be a very complicated affair for many organizations. In this guide we have tried to simplify everything so you have a good idea of what you need to know when applying the GDPR in your organization.

The GDPR takes effect for all companies that process or hold personal data in the European Union on May 25th 2018.

So what do you need to know about data protection?

The GDPR is a serious approach to data security, information management and privacy in general. This isn’t a matter of being more restrictive or “overly strict”, but one of being more precise.

In other words it is a way to be sure that unwanted unwanted access doesn’t occur to your personal data. In addition, you can protect your company from accidental loss and use of sensitive information.

This law is primarily intended to help secure personal information, but does apply to all types of data. It also establishes the responsibility of the organization that owns or manages that kind of data.

After all, if there are cases that violate the rights of individuals, then this is an area where you want to have enough space to move. So what are these rights?

Data protection & privacy under the GDPR

The GDPR is primarily oriented towards users’ rights. It states what you can do with your own data and how organizations must process it.. In addition, the new legislation also includes a series of sanctions for non-compliance with obligations set out in this regulation. That’s why compliance is so important…

Data protection & privacy under the GDPR

The GDPR is primarily oriented towards users’ rights. It states what you can do with your own data and how organizations must process it..

It also includes a series of sanctions for non-compliance with obligations set out in this regulation. That’s why compliance is so important…

Right to personal data In Article 15 of the General Data Protection Regulation, privacy rights have been formalized as a right of all persons within the European Union, regardless of whether they live in the EU or not. These individuals can ask that their own personal information be removed or destroyed from a company’s systems.

The right to personal data lists the actions that must be taken when a person asks for their information to be corrected, deleted or restricted. 

These include:

• The right to access your own data (including the origin of the data and its processing purpose). So you can request any information you want about how your personal data has been stored or processed. This includes details on who it has been shared with and for what purposes.

For example, if you ask for a report of all your purchases within a specific period of time, then this request may seem too burdening and disproportionate in relation to the expected result.

• The right to rectification. 

This covers any mistakes within your personal data, such as a mistake in a name or a wrong address being entered incorrectly.

• The right to restriction of processing. This also applies to any automated processing of your personal data that has resulted in a misidentification of an individual or an inviolable damage to their rights. For example, you can ask for the removal of all your personal information from a company’s databases if you have been the victim of fraud.

Right to erasure In Article 17 of the GDPR, there is a specific type of erasure that may be requested by an individual: the “right to be forgotten” .

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