Peter Frampton’s Frampton Comes Alive! a “big album”| Check out How It Happened

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istockphoto 108195157 170667a
istockphoto 108195157 170667a

Peter Frampton’s Frampton Comes Alive! is a 1976 live album by the English rock musician. The album went to number one on the charts and has sold 18 million copies worldwide.

what designated peter frampton’s frampton comes alive! a “big album”?

Peter Frampton’s Frampton Comes Alive! was released in 1976 and sold 18 million copies, which is huge sales. It is the biggest selling live album of all time.

In order to qualify as a “big album”, an album must first go platinum in U.S. sales (1 million sales) and at least 2 million copies worldwide. 

Most big albums (such as Frampton Comes Alive!) sell between 3 to 7 million copies globally and have an electric length of 40 minutes or more. 

This should give you an idea about how many units you need to move before you see yourself in a Big Album category.

Peter Frampton’s Frampton Comes Alive! a “big album”| Check out How It Happened :

1. “Going to California” – Frampton Comes Alive! – 

Frampton’s last three albums had been mild commercial successes, but none of them had made a lasting impression. 

His live album, recorded in an attempt to bring some life to his latest studio release, was released with a modest cover and quickly disappeared. 

But the live album itself became a big hit, culminating in the Grammy Award for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group.

2. “Show Me the Way” – 

 The single peaked at number five on the U.S. charts and became one of the most-played radio songs of 1976. It became a gold record, awarded for sales of over one million.

3. “Do You Feel Like We Do” –

  This song was based on the classic blues song “Smokestack Lightning” by Howlin’ Wolf. The single became another big hit, reaching number six on the U.S. singles chart. It sold a million copies and was awarded gold record status by the RIAA in late 1976.

4.  ”Baby, I Love Your Way” –  

The single peaked at number nine on the U.S. charts and sold more than a million copies, making it one of the most successful releases of 1976. It was awarded gold record status by the RIAA in late 1976.

5. “Show Me the Way” –  

The single peaked at number five on the U.S. charts and became one of the most-played radio songs of 1976. It became a gold record, awarded for sales of over one million.

6. “I Can Lose” – 

 The single peaked at number 33 on the U.S. charts and became another of 1976’s top 10 hits, reaching number eight on the singles chart.

 The song sold more than a million copies, making it one of Peter Frampton’s most successful releases in the U.S.

7. “You Can Leave Your Hat On” – 

 Peter Frampton was beginning to gain a reputation as a singer-songwriter, an identity he would continue to forge successfully until his retirement in 1989. 

The single peaked at number six on the U.S. singles chart and became one of Peter Frampton’s most successful releases in the U.S.

8. “Don’t You Ever Try to Take Me Away from Me” – 

This song was inspired by a song by Scotty Moore (of Elvis Presley’s backing band, The Jordanaires). 

Frampton’s version peaked at number seven on the U.S. singles chart. It sold more than a million copies, making it one of Peter Frampton’s most successful releases in the U.S.

9. “I Got the Fire” –

  This song was recorded at the 1976 Knebworth Festival, and appeared on the live album Frampton Comes Alive! It was later released as a single, peaking at number four on the U.S. singles chart and was awarded gold record status by the RIAA in late 1977.

10. “Mustang Sally” –

 Peter Frampton and his then-fiancée Susanna Hoffs had become more than just friends after meeting in 1975, and they were married a few weeks after this album’s release. 

The single peaked at number nine on the U.S. charts and sold more than a million copies, making it one of Peter Frampton’s most successful releases in the U.S.

11.  “I Can Feel You” – 

This song was released as a single in late 1977, but did not chart in any major markets. It sold more than a million copies, making it one of Peter Frampton’s most successful releases in the U.S.

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